How to Treat Neck Pain From Sleeping

Ever wonder why your neck hurt after a long trip? Or even after sleeping on your bed, why is it your neck hurts? Doesn’t it just get annoying? Well, don’t worry. It’s a common issue especially if you’re the kind of person who sleeps in the subway, in the car, or even while you’re working.

neck pain from sleeping relief

Ever wonder why your neck hurt after a long trip? Or even after sleeping on your bed, why is it your neck hurts? Doesn’t it just get annoying? Well, don’t worry. It’s a common issue especially if you’re the kind of person who sleeps in the subway, in the car, or even while you’re working. Often times, neck pain from sleeping involve a bad position for your neck. The position could be you hanging your head a bit too low or even the aircon or cold wind blasting at your nape. For those who have long hair, they have less chances except if they really sleep in a bad position.

So, how do you deal with neck pain from sleeping? What is a common relief way to get that annoying neck pain out of the way? Here are five possible ways to get that neck pain from sleeping relief.

 

Stretch your neck. Slowly.

Don’t shock your neck by suddenly stretching. The best way to start stretching your neck is to move it slowly. Often times, the pain in your neck is due to stiffness and atrophying of muscles. So the best way to work that off is to move it gently. You don’t have to do any fancy work out; just rotate your head a bit slightly so to get your bones creaking and your muscles loosened up.

 

Hot Towel

The hot towel method is one of the fun kinds. As you put your towel in hot water or warm water if you have sensitive skin, you can place it on your neck to help warm up your muscles. Now don’t leave the towel on for too long. Otherwise, the towel will get cold and you’ll be back to square one with a creaky and painful neck.

 

Painkillers

There are several kinds of painkillers. The most recommended ones are the ones you put on your skin. Since some painkillers can elicit allergic reactions when ingested, using the skin-based ones might be safer. At the same time, they have a nice menthol feel which will help loosen up the muscles in your neck. They also smell pretty good so you don’t have to worry about trying to disguise the relief that you’re putting on your neck.

A common painkiller that people use is either Ponstan for ingestion or for topical, there’s Omega Painkiller. Other people use White Flower, a common Chinese oil or Salonpas.

 

Don’t stay in a cold room.

Sometimes, staying in a cold room may be more problematic than originally envisioned. Why? If the room is colder than regular room temperature then, your neck may be more prone to freezing and stiffening up. Even more so if you’re sitting in front of the aircon, that would be completely awful when your neck stiffens up even worse. You’ll be stuck with a stiff and painful neck the whole day if you do so.

Warm up your neck first before going into an aircon room. That way, you can loosen up your muscles and they won’t stiffen up again.

 

Have a neck pillow with you.

If you know you’re prone to falling asleep while sitting up, having a neck pillow can ease the pain. It’ll also prevent further neck pain by keeping the area where your neck is soft. The pillow can also help ease the neck pain from sleeping by keeping the area applied with the pain reliever covered. The heat caused between your body and the pillow will be contained and trigger the relieving effect of the painkiller. By the time you’re up, the painkiller should have been able to work some of its magic to help ease your painful neck.

 

Sources:

Leak, A. M., Cooper, J., Dyer, S., Williams, K. A., Turner-Stokes, L., & Frank, A. O. (1994). The Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire, devised to measure neck pain and disability. Rheumatology, 33(5), 469-474.

Webb, R., Brammah, T., Lunt, M., Urwin, M., Allison, T., & Symmons, D. (2003). Prevalence and predictors of intense, chronic, and disabling neck and back pain in the UK general population. Spine, 28(11), 1195-1202.

Helewa, A., Goldsmith, C. H., Smythe, H. A., Lee, P., Obright, K., & Stitt, L. (2007). Effect of therapeutic exercise and sleeping neck support on patients with chronic neck pain: a randomized clinical trial. The Journal of rheumatology, 34(1), 151-158.

Barry, M., & Jenner, J. R. (1995). ABC of rheumatology. Pain in neck, shoulder, and arm. BMJ: British Medical Journal, 310(6973), 183.

Salo, P. K., Häkkinen, A. H., Kautiainen, H., & Ylinen, J. J. (2010). Effect of neck strength training on health-related quality of life in females with chronic neck pain: a randomized controlled 1-year follow-up study. Health and quality of life outcomes, 8(1), 48.

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